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69 Rustang

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I feel like I'm in the same spot. I have the water pump. Have not put it on. I also have the test kit coming to see if I have any combustion gasses in the cooling system. If the test comes back negative, I'll do the water pump and timing cover next. 
Interesting!  Good luck!  Do you have a Plan B if the head gaskets are leaking?  Fix it or something fun?  Off topic...LOL

 

SteveO_71

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For whatever reason, I could never get a spring into the lower hose so had to leave it out. Here is a related article but cant say how valid it is:

Original equipment molded radiator hoses often were equipped with a coil inside them. Some refer to this coil as a spring, but it isn't really a spring. Actually just a piece of thin metal rod that has been twisted, it was designed to facilitate the installation of coolant on the assembly line, and nothing more.

When the cooling system of a car is completely drained, or in the case of a brand new car under construction, never had coolant in it, there is a considerable amount of air in the passage ways. Normally, when filling up the cooling system, you start the car to circulate the coolant, displace trapped air, and then top it off. On the assembly line, this wasn't feasible, so air in the cooling system was evacuated by essentially pulling a vacuum on it. This also had the added advantage of speeding up the introduction of the coolant mixture to the cooling system as well. The coil in the lower radiator hose prevented the hose from collapsing under this higher than normal vacuum.

Once the car left the factory, the coil served no further purpose. This is why replacement hoses usually do not have a coil in them. Most cooling systems operate at 12-15 P.S.I., which is controlled by the radiator cap. This is enough pressure to allow a normally functioning cooling system to operate efficiently, yet not enough to cause collapsed hoses or leaks in seals if they're in good condition. If the lower radiator hose collapses, it is normally due to a fault somewhere else in the system, and is not necessarily indicative of a bad hose, although an old hose certainly might be susceptible to collapse due to age. Normally, if the hose is in good condition but collapsing and blocking the flow of coolant, the radiator cap is bad or there's a blockage somewhere else causing pressure to build up in the cooling system.

As vehicles with original hoses began to age, the coil would sometimes begin to corrode and deteriorate, circulating tiny pieces of metal throughout the cooling system. We'll leave it to your imagination what this did to water pumps and thermostats.

This is just one of many interesting stories about automobiles, the people who build them, and how they were built, brought to you by Automotive Mileposts.

 
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For whatever reason, I could never get a spring into the lower hose so had to leave it out. Here is a related article but cant say how valid it is:

Original equipment molded radiator hoses often were equipped with a coil inside them. Some refer to this coil as a spring, but it isn't really a spring. Actually just a piece of thin metal rod that has been twisted, it was designed to facilitate the installation of coolant on the assembly line, and nothing more.

When the cooling system of a car is completely drained, or in the case of a brand new car under construction, never had coolant in it, there is a considerable amount of air in the passage ways. Normally, when filling up the cooling system, you start the car to circulate the coolant, displace trapped air, and then top it off. On the assembly line, this wasn't feasible, so air in the cooling system was evacuated by essentially pulling a vacuum on it. This also had the added advantage of speeding up the introduction of the coolant mixture to the cooling system as well. The coil in the lower radiator hose prevented the hose from collapsing under this higher than normal vacuum.

Once the car left the factory, the coil served no further purpose. This is why replacement hoses usually do not have a coil in them. Most cooling systems operate at 12-15 P.S.I., which is controlled by the radiator cap. This is enough pressure to allow a normally functioning cooling system to operate efficiently, yet not enough to cause collapsed hoses or leaks in seals if they're in good condition. If the lower radiator hose collapses, it is normally due to a fault somewhere else in the system, and is not necessarily indicative of a bad hose, although an old hose certainly might be susceptible to collapse due to age. Normally, if the hose is in good condition but collapsing and blocking the flow of coolant, the radiator cap is bad or there's a blockage somewhere else causing pressure to build up in the cooling system.

As vehicles with original hoses began to age, the coil would sometimes begin to corrode and deteriorate, circulating tiny pieces of metal throughout the cooling system. We'll leave it to your imagination what this did to water pumps and thermostats.

This is just one of many interesting stories about automobiles, the people who build them, and how they were built, brought to you by Automotive Mileposts.
Interesting article and does make sense. 

I can't be 100% sure as it's been 8 years since I replaced my hoses, but I'm thinking the coil was already in the lower hose when purchased, but as I said, I could be wrong. I just don't remember putting it in there. I was always under the understanding that the lower hose could collapse and as a precaution, the coil was there to stop that happening. As for corroding, possibly, but with the proper coolant mixture, a bit less likely. I personally have not had one corrode to the point of breaking up. However, something to keep in mind. As for Big Red's lower hose, I'll back up a previous statement and go with try it without and if it doesn't show signs of collapse, leave it alone.

 

Big Red Mach 1

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Interesting!  Good luck!  Do you have a Plan B if the head gaskets are leaking?  Fix it or something fun?  Off topic...LOL
I really can't yet wrap my head around what I will do if I in fact have a leak. Part of me would just say take a long weekend, replace the head gaskets and do the water pump at the same time. 

The other part of me would want to take the opportunity to go all the way, and do something fun like stroke it. But it's just time and money that's the pisser. Money wise, if I went that route I'd probably sell my boat and use the funds from that. If I do that, I'd have a decent budget of around $13k to play with. I just hope to not have to go that route. 

 

mjseakan

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I vote keep the boat.

(I'd say sell your house, wife, kids, pets instead but I don't know you well enough for that)

 

Big Red Mach 1

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Head gaskets are not hard to swap.  I can do a pair in the car in under 3 hours.  Valve adjustment is a little time consuming.
Not hard, but I don't move fast. For me, I'd take a weekend to do it at my typical slow pace. 

 

Big Red Mach 1

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I probably would too, but the actual work isn't too bad.  As long as there is no damage to address it is mostly a lot of careful cleaning before reassembly
Yup. Still hoping I don't have to do it. But if I do, it will definitely be yet another time I'll wish this car did not have A/C.

 

Big Red Mach 1

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Well, my kit came. I spent a little extra and bought the one in the hard case. I like all my specialty tools in hard cases and always buy them that way if it's an option. 

...The results are in....Per my test tonight, it does not look like I have any combustion gasses entering my cooling system (still knocks on wood anyway). Got her up to temp. Watched the thermostat open up at the proper temp with my laser thermometer. Then tested once. Color stayed as blue as it was in the bottle. Squeezed the little ball until it wouldn't take air anymore. Did it 4 or 5 times. Then shut off the car for a couple of minutes. Let it heat soak for a few, fired it up again, let her run, and did it again 4 or 5 times. No change in the color at all. 

What I do believe I need is a good flush. There is definitely a lot of gunk in the system as shown before. It's not oily. Just a green/brown residue. Going to flush the hell out of her this weekend. I'll bet this helps tremendously. You guys use the Simple Green for flushes? What's everyone like to flush with? 

20201028_173952.jpg

 
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Big Red Mach 1

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Thanks Don C. I always assumed this stuff was very acidic. Don't know why. I thought I used to remember warnings on the old labels about not leaving it in your system too long. This would have been 20+ years ago though. Maybe the old stuff was. I was looking for something non-toxic and non acidic so I can leave it in there for a bit to really clean like crazy. Sounds like this will do the trick. Thanks!

 

Don C

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Yeah, back in the day you just left it in for a while, drain and flush, and then use a neutralizer and flush again. But it just took 30 minutes, not 3 days. Yes it was toxic. While the new stuff may not be toxic it can still flush out some lead and other metals with it.

 

69 Rustang

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So I just bought some of the Prestone flush fluid.  I used a bottle in my ‘31 Model A—drove it about an hour, idled for a while, then drained it.  Flushed with fresh water for another 30 minutes or so after that and then refilled the system.  So far, it seems to be better.  I was worried about it being aggressive to an old radiator (90+ years!), and I do have an area in the middle of the radiator that looks corroded (green) but it isn’t leaking now and wasn’t leaking there before.  I am planning the same treatment for my ‘69 after the head gasket leak test.  Glad to hear you don’t have a HG leak!

 
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Big Red Mach 1

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I know this is an older thread I started, but thought I'd update. I mentioned a while back that the Hooker long tubes with ceramic coating helped a little but not a lot. Well, I just got everything behind the headers re-done and I added a H-Pipe. Previously the exhaust just ran straight back through a set of Flowmasters and out. No crossover at all. I know that exhaust scavenging can be important in a lot of ways, and lowering the temps under the hood certainly seems to be one. Seemed like the heat transfer under the hood took quite a while longer to really heat up. Exhaust note also sounds just as good if not better than it did previously also. 

 
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