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The Rickster - a 73 Mach 1 work in progress


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This morning, I ground the welds on the quarter panel patch.  I found a few pinholes that I also welded up and dressed.  It came out pretty nice, I think.  A very thin skim coat of body filler, and yo

Thanks, droptop.  I was telling the wife that with all the work and upgrades going into this Mach 1, when it's done, it will be more like a Mach 2.5.   

Thanks, Rio, timachone, and Fabrice.  It's my first real project like this, and I think it's going pretty well.  I'm really getting excited seeing it actually come together.  Don, I looked at add

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That looks realy, really good! A big step forward :thumb:

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Tim

 

Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly :runninpony:

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Very nice work. Great attention to detail.

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Wisdom, knowledge and intelligence are three very different things.

1971 convertible, H-code, Ram Air

1971 Mach I, M-code, Ram Air

1972 Mexican GT-351

1988 Bronco II

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For sure you are moving along. Glad you went to the Tech school to get in shape for all the welding. Great work you are doing your brother an honor building this car.

 

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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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With the B-pillar in place and secure, it's time to turn to to the inner and outer wheelhouses and quarter panel.  With the quarter panel laid outside down, I put the outer wheelhouse in place, clamping it to the wheel well opening.  It took some muscle to squeeze get it clamped together, but it came together nicely.  I then did the same to the wheelhouses, clamping the inner and outer wheelhouse together. 

Once I was convinced that they would fit together, I got to work cutting out the inner wheel house.  I drilled/ground the welds.  I cut along the lower edge, just above the trunk floor, so I could more easily remove the strip along the bottom edge.  Once the inner wheelhouse was removed, I cleaned up the flanges.  I fitted the inner wheelhouse and found that the flange was about an inch away from the edge of the trunk floor.  

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I decided to make a thin pie cut to pull the edge closer to the trunk floor. I made it kind of long to minimize the angular change and make it easier to mate with the outer wheelhouse.  It wasn't hard, but it was slow and tedious, but I got it done. 

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After that, I refit the piece and found that it fit really nicely, only about 1/4 inch from the trunk floor edge when in was snugged into the wheel well.  I marked out where the spot welds needed to go, and again, removed inner wheelhouse, so that I could drill the spot weld holes and clean up where the spot welds would go.   

With all that done, I was finally able to get the inner wheelhouse put in place for the last time.  I put a few tacks in some of the spot weld sites to secure it, and started welding.  I ran out of time today, but have about half the spot welds completed. 

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Tomorrow, I will get it finished up, and get started on the outer wheel house.  Making progress, slowly, but surely.

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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Very nice work! The car is going to be better than new when you're done. 

[align=left]Jeff T.

 

When I die I want to die like grandpa, peacefully in my sleep... not screaming, like his passengers. [/align]

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  • 3 weeks later...

It's been a couple weeks since I've posted an update.  I finished getting the outer wheel house welded in.  I was focused on getting things done, and forgot to take pictures on a bunch of it.  I did get the outer wheel welded in, though, and then the right quarter panel.  After I got the outer wheelhouse in place, I welded in the trunk drop.  I finished welding in the outer wheelhouse, and finally the quarter panel.  The quarter panel takes some time, as it has it a LOT of spot welds. 

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On to the left side.  I got the quarter panel skin removed and found a lot of surface rust.  Not a surprise.

  

After removing the quarter panel, I discovered the bracket holding the outer wheelhouse was seriously rusted.  

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As you can see, the outer edge of the wheelhouse was completely rusted out.  I cut the spotwelds holding the bracket so that I could remove it and rebuild it on the bench.  The inner wheelhouse had only one small area that needed to be patched, so I decided to keep it.  I drilled out the spot welds holding it to the car frame, leaving that thin piece of the flange attached to the inner wheelhouse. 

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Since the outer and inner wheelhouses are welded together, I decided to leave a thin flange of the original outer wheelhouse, and weld the replacement outer wheelhouse to it.  That, in turn, was welded to the frame.  So essentially, there were 4 layers welded together instead of the original three.  I also welded the trunk drop in place and got ready for the quarter panel.

I test fit the quarter panel with the outer wheelhouse in place, and it seemed to fit fine.  I drilled for the spot welds and cleaned up around the plug weld sites and treated it with copper based weld through primer.  20210203_180641.thumb.jpg.873ca99af8cd8c22c732cd77d043e81f.jpg

I cleaned up the surface rust and repaired the outer wheelhouse bracket and got it reinstalled.  I used Eastwood rust converter on the surface rusted frame and then sprayed it with Eastwood Rust Encapsulator before putting the quarter panel on for the last time.

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With the quarter panel in place, I started spot welding it into place.  I started with one spot weld at the bottom of the B pillar, since that has to be fixed.  I then moved to the back.  On the passenger side, I had a little problem with the quarter panel extension fitment (more on that later), so I fit the quarter panel extension to the back of the quarter panel after each weld, making sure it still fit, as I welded it to the taillight panel.  I wish I had done it this way on the passenger side.  Live and learn.  

The quarter panel is provided as original, with a flange that fits under the bracket that goes along the front edge of the trunk opening.  I didn't want to remove the spot welds and try to lift that long piece, because bending and kinking it would be easy to do, so I trimmed it along the edge and butt welded it to the original piece.  

After a few hours, I had the dozens and dozens of spot welds completed.  I trimmed the trunk drop along the bottom so the quarter fit it a little better, and got the trunk drop and quarter welded together.  Did I mention that laying on ones back and welding overhead is a pain in the butt? Anyway, I finished the left quarter panel!!!

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So, what about the right rear quarter panel extension, you ask.  Well, when I put the right rear quarter panel extension in place, it edge dropped off, about 1/4" and the edge, and it didn't follow the curve along the side.  I had only welded it in 4 spots along that back edge, so i cut the spot welds to allow it to move, so I could get it to match the extension.

With much trepidation, I sliced open the rather expensive quarter panel, just under the body line.  This allowed me to lift the back edge up to match the upper edge of the extension.  Once I was happy with it, I tacked it in position and did the same with the outside edge.  With both top edge and outside edge matching the extension rather nicely, I finished off all the spot welds in that panel.  Finally, the quarter panel was completely welded in, just with a big gash in it. 

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 I got some metal and tried to make a patch for it, but it was so long and skinny, it just wasn't working for me.  I decided to just do it in two pieces, so that is what I did.  I got the wider patch made up and tacked in, and then got the skinny one done and tacked in.  

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And that is where it stands, today.  Tomorrow, I will grind down the weld, check for pinholes and fix them, and call it good.  

Both quarter panels are now installed.  At this point, there is only one original exterior body panel left on the car, and that is the roof.  It comes off tomorrow.  YeeHaw!!!

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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Wow, you tackled a masterpiece of work in this car, awesome, much respect for this! This is not for the faint hearted! 

Hold on - it looks indeed like a car again, and a well done one, Sir :thumb: 

Hold on and keep up the good work! 

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Tim

 

Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly :runninpony:

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Nice work Ron

With the roof skin off, now would be the time to add an extra brace in the back.

The rear section of the roof is so flat, they are easily dented.

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Ohio Mustang Supply

440-949-2556

 

http://www.7173mustangs.com/images/oms_sig_banner.jpg

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Wow, some serious and well done work done here! The day you will put a big smile on when you'll take it for a spin is now much closer!

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73 modified Grande 351C. (Finally back on the road woohoo!) 

71 429CJ. ( In progress )

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On adding an extra roof bow. I think cars with 3/4 vinyl roof have an extra bow. I have never had my headliner out so I cannot say but I think there they have the trim across the top there is another reinforcement there. The trim is held on by the T pins welded to it with the slide on plastic trim clips.

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When a man is in the woods and talks and no women are there is he still wrong??:P

David

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11 hours ago, Carolina_Mountain_Mustangs said:

On adding an extra roof bow. I think cars with 3/4 vinyl roof have an extra bow. I have never had my headliner out so I cannot say but I think there they have the trim across the top there is another reinforcement there. The trim is held on by the T pins welded to it with the slide on plastic trim clips.

+1

So it is! 

Tim

 

Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly :runninpony:

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I'm adding the 3/4 vinyl roof to my sled. I was able to get that extra brace that David mentions from Don at OMS. I was lucky he had one.

Thanks Don!!!

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's been a couple weeks since my last update, but I have been busy.  I welded the quarter panel seams on both sides.  I punched the holes along the sides and drilled the holes for the plug welds along the front and rear seams.  I got it in place, not as easy as it seems when working alone, but I got it done.  I clamped it in place and started welding.  Along the joint with the quarter panel, I did plug weld as done by the factory, but then as Qcode suggested, welded the entire seam.  

Finally, all of the body panels that need to be replaced, have been replaced.  Now time for body work.

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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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I had welded the quarter panel and roof seams completely.  I filled the seam with Fibral followed by a thin layer of Evercoat Rage Ultra.  It took a few thin coats and some quality sanding time, but I got the the body lines straight and lining up.  In the meantime, I also sanded off the EDP coating on the roof and quarter panels. 

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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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In stripping the fenders, I found some pinholes along the back edge behind the reinforcement.  I cut out the rusted area and made a patch to fit it.

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I tacked it in place and stitched it in place, ground the welds to finish it off.  Alas, I forgot to get photos of that part of it, but it was a pretty typical repair.  Below is a picture of the completed repair that I took this morning.

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I then moved on to stripping the drivers door.  When I installed the door, it dropped and bent the lower rear corner.  Closer inspection revealed some pinholes.  Stripping the paint revealed more pinholes.  I cut the door skin to reveal the extent of the rot.  20210218_115405.thumb.jpg.520291e1c7b9b216caa2bd55f6d62478.jpg

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The rust had eaten through the inner surface as well.  I cut out a patch to fit the edge of the panel.  I scribed the panel and cut out the rusted area.  It was kind of a weird curve.  I bent a wider piece to a curve that was close and then cut it down to fit.  I also cut a patch that would replace the bottom edge that was rusted out. I then proceeded to tack it into place and stitch weld it all around the perimeter of the patch.

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I used a straightedge to extend the lines of the existing metal and removed the excess material so i could fit the outer panel.

I cut an oversized patch to fit the cut edges, but run long on the outside edges.  Once I had the fit along the inside edges right where I wanted, I marked the outside edges and made a 90 degree bend so I could more easily make that hem along the outside.  

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After securing the patch in place, I used hammer and dolly to work the hem down and secure it.  On the back side, I put a strong tack every couple inches, as there had been a single spot weld that I had to remove along each outer hem. 

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With the hem secured, and the welds were ground and the repair was complete. 

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A skim coat of body filler, and you'll never know it as repaired.  I'm happy with it.  

More to come.  Adventures with body filler, sandpaper, and primer.  The paint shop said they could get to it in 2-1/2 weeks, so I've got to keep rolling.

Edited by 73MustangCoupe
added another photo of finished fender patch
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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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Oh, and then there was the front corner of the drivers door.  

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Stripping the paint revealed more rust damage.  I thought the door was fairly solid, and the passenger side was, but this one definitely needed some love.  I decided to do the repair with multiple pieces welded together, to make the patch, and then weld that in place.  I started at the top, and cut a piece that was a bit larger and curved it to match the door corner.  I then used some cardboard to make a template for the "step", as it was angled and kind of a trick to make.  It was a lot easier trimming cardboard, time after time, sneaking up to the proper shape, that it would have been with metal. 

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The lower piece was the last one, and was more straightforward, after getting the curve, it was cutting the width, and tacking it to the other patch pieces.

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With the patch fitting pretty nicely, I cut out the rusted area to see what was underneath and size my patch.

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With the patch cut to size and tacked along the front, I stitch welded the patch completely along the back side and also stitch welded the front.  Then I was able to grind the welds as needed to blend the edges without thinning the metal to much.  

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And after a little clean up, the door is ready for some body filler and epoxy.  

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Making progress.  Slowly, but surely.  Still shooting to have it on the road by July 1st.

 

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Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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You got skills!!!! Very nice job!!!!  I'm curious, which welder are you using and what type and size wire?

Edited by rio1856
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Wow, that are some awesome fabrication skills - congratulations you made it through, well done :wrench:

Tim

 

Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly :runninpony:

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Thanks, Rio and Tim.  It's been quite a journey.  The paint shop said they can get it around the middle of March, and I'm nowhere near ready, so I have to stay focused.

Rio, I have an Eastwood 135 MIG welder that I received as a Fathers Day gift about 10 yrs ago.  I am using 023 wire.   I will switch to .030 or .035 if I am welding something more than 14 gauge sheet metal or 1/8" angle, but that is not very often.   

Ron

The Rickster, a 1973 Mach 1, being restored as a tribute to my brother who passed away with COVID in July 2020.

Billy, a 1976 Ford Bronco, also needs a lot of work.

El Guapo, a 1986 F150, frame-off Resto-Mod.

Also, in the queue, a 1950 Ford F1 Panel truck and 1962 Falcon Ranchero

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