subframe connectors and speed humps

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Vinnie

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Hey all, I guess this question is about handling...

For those who have subframe connectors, did you ever have trouble getting over speed humps etc?

Cheers,

Vincent.

 
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Not at all. They are pretty much the same height as the front and back frame heights. Mine go right inside the front box.  now my electric cutouts for my headers is a different story.... I gotta be careful how fast I go over speed bumps or they will scrape. 

 

Mister 4x4

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I also have the Global West SFCs, and haven't had any issues.  Mine's pretty much stock height. 

I'm more worried about catching the old school Lakewood traction bars, to be honest - but, no worries so far.  You can see the leading end of the Lakewood sticking out to the left of the tire, and the flat black piece just above it would be the bottom of rear end of the Global West SFCs.

rearaxle1.jpg

Even better pic of the traction bars.  The SFCs curve up and weld onto the rear frame just ahead of the axle.

driverquarter2.jpg

Here's a 'prettier' picture of the car - when it was still in the process of being put back together, though.  You can make out the traction bar, thanks to all the bondo and primer dust from the body shop.

newwheels1.jpg

 
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midlife

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The solution is to get a bulldozer and remove the speedhumps.  I hate them things!

 

Vinnie

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Thanks for the replies. I checked out the GW and TM models. The Tinmans's look more natural to the car but it seems a lot more work getting them on the car.

As I do not have a rotisserie nor do I have a lift, is either one easier to weld in when the floor is out?

Cheers,

Vincent.

 
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I set my car up on risers made of 4 x 4's to raise it up to install the Tinmans frame connectors. I did modify them a little and made plates to bolt up to the floor pans for a better installation.....

Thanks, Jay

 
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Thanks for the replies. I checked out the GW and TM models. The Tinmans's look more natural to the car but it seems a lot more work getting them on the car.

As I do not have a rotisserie nor do I have a lift, is either one easier to weld in when the floor is out?

Cheers,

Vincent.
As far as looks you can't see either one unless you look under the car.  They both have their pros and cons.  Yes -tinman's do blend in more with the frame.  As far as installing the GW's are easier to do with the car on jack stands.  Just need to remove the rear wheels for better access on the rear.  Here are a few pics from my install.

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20210113_101218_resized.jpg

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20210105_121059_resized.jpg

 

Robsweden

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Just quick reminder when installing the GW connectors the car should be resting on the wheels, rear wheels can be removed when welding. Just put something under the axle.

 
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Just quick reminder when installing the GW connectors the car should be resting on the wheels, rear wheels can be removed when welding. Just put something under the axle.
Yes - Thanks for pointing that out.  A very important thing to do.  I had my front wheels on ramps and the rear axle on jack stands.  

 
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As far as looks you can't see either one unless you look under the car. They both have their pros and cons. Yes -tinman's do blend in more with the frame. As far as installing the GW's are easier to do with the car on jack stands. Just need to remove the rear wheels for better access on the rear. Here are a few pics from my install.
View attachment 57445
I am in the process of determining which way to go. Since I have carpeting and insulation, I was leaning toward Global West. However, looking at this setup, is there a GAP at the back end of the connector and frame?
 
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I am in the process of determining which way to go. Since I have carpeting and insulation, I was leaning toward Global West. However, looking at this setup, is there a GAP at the back end of the connector and frame?
There is a small plate that you shape with a grinder and is used to fill in the rear area. You can see it here at the 7:35 mark in this video. I sprayed the inside area with some paint before I capped it off. Hope this helps.

 

Robsweden

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I am in the process of determining which way to go. Since I have carpeting and insulation, I was leaning toward Global West. However, looking at this setup, is there a GAP at the back end of the connector and frame?
There is a gap , but they give two metal pieces to weld in and cover the gap.
 
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