Slowest resto ever - Project AmsterFoose / Current subject: The bloody floor.

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detritusmaximus

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Its official!! Woohoo!

If the project does snowball, are you going to change the name to "Foose-ball"?

 

Vinnie

Project manager "Project AmsterFoose"
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Its official!! Woohoo!

If the project does snowball, are you going to change the name to "Foose-ball"?
Haha, maybe if I were German (fussbal) ;-) The joke doesn't work in Dutch (voetbal)...

 

detritusmaximus

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Its official!! Woohoo!

If the project does snowball, are you going to change the name to "Foose-ball"?
Haha, maybe if I were German (fussbal) ;-) The joke doesn't work in Dutch (voetbal)...
Fussbal works if you get too tied up with tedious little details!

I must say, though, that I am one who not only falls prey to the 'while you're in there' mentality, but I am a proponent of it. Maybe not to a concourse level, but I do believe in saving myself from hassle and heartache later by taking care of additional issues at least to the point that its my choice to tear back into something later rather than because something failed or rotted out. Then again, I have Opels and they have smaller lighter parts.

 

Vinnie

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Alright! I visited professor Fabrice’s secret laboratory out in the whoop whoops and was given the grand tour around his bling bling business. Pretty cool and he even put on a live plating-show for me, I saw the magic in action, awesome!

But also... WOW! That’s what I gotta say about my dipped hood! I picked it up yesterday. As you may remember I gave my hood the vinegar/rustyco treatment last fall. BIG effort but no big results for me as there was still rust on the inside. So I brought it to a dipper (website: https://www.autobeitserij.nl/en/). Here it was dipped in 3 baths:

1) Paint stripping in caustic soda. This will remove all paint, filler etc. After this step is when most people start to realise what they have started ;-)

2) De-rusting with phosphoric acid. Contrary to hydrochloric acid this leaves no chance for rust to re-appear.

3) Electrolytical coating. First a sinc phosphate coating is put on to protect against rust. Then a coat of primer is put on, all while suspended in liquid. Every possible seam or tube is coated.

Let’s look at some pics:

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Nice!

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Above is the worst engineered spot in a standard hood, water collects here and... creates a hole.

f2f81a1c66a7e8235cae698d323221b5.jpg


Above shows some pitting but nothing bad.

This hood is now 100% rust free and rust protected for the next 50 years. It can wait in my garage until I need it, in about 10 years ;-)

 
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My secret laboratory? You mean the biggest mess that my garage has even seen! :)

Your hood looks brand new. It's even smooth inside. I think that aside the rust removal, the fact that the treatment removes all the paint for you makes it already worth it. Mine had layers and layers of different types of paint, some resistant to paint removers... Had to use lots of bad words before get to the bare metal!

 

Vinnie

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Your hood looks brand new. It's even smooth inside. I think that aside the rust removal, the fact that the treatment removes all the paint for you makes it already worth it. Mine had layers and layers of different types of paint, some resistant to paint removers... Had to use lots of bad words before get to the bare metal!
I know, it saves a hell of a lot of time and it's OK for many decades to come. I'm more convinced than ever that I want my whole car to be dipped now. It's the only way to get a 100% rust free body and it comes back wearing a base coat ready to start building the car again. I'm very happy with the way this experiment went :)

 

7173Vert

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Interesting... did the dipping process remove the factory applied deadener that separates the top and bottom of the hood? I debated sending my hood in when I did my restoration, but i did not want to chance losing the factory application as noted. There is no way to reinstall back to factory after the fact... looks good though.

 

Vinnie

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I’m not sure what you mean by deadener, a piece of fabric or glue or something sprayed on? I think either way the answer is: it’s gone. The hood appears to have been separated before coz the spot welds at the front have been drilled out. All the glue and anything sprayed on is gone and there is no fabric left except for a few small bits that came out when I cleaned it.

 
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The deadener I believe 7173 is referring to is the sprayed in foam/adhesive that is applied to the under hood panel prior to it being bonded to the top hood panel. This is done to keep the panels separated and avoid metal on metal contact and the rattling sound from that. If this bonding material is gone, you will know it driving down the road and the hood top skin will flex up and down and you will probably hear some metal rattling sounds when you close it. You may need to look into this a little deeper and find out from your dipper if his process removes that (I would think so) and if there is a way to reapply some solution for it being gone.

 
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The deadener I believe  7173 is referring to is the sprayed in foam/adhesive that is applied to the under hood panel prior to it being bonded to the top hood panel.  This is done to keep the panels separated and avoid metal on metal contact and the rattling sound from that.  If this bonding material is gone, you will know it driving down the road and the hood top skin will flex up and down and you will probably hear some metal rattling sounds when you close it.  You may need to look into this a little deeper and find out from your dipper if his process removes that (I would think so) and if there is a way to reapply some solution for it being gone.
For the body, are there many "isolation spots" done this way?

On the hood from what I saw, I don't think there would be much efforts involved to re-isolate it, easy access too. I guess same could apply for doors and deck lid.

but for the body, I have no idea.

 
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You can buy a expanding foam from a builders merchant. You would need to purchase a longer piece of tubing to get right into the end. Its not a motor industry solution but worth consideration. Theres also a Canadian breathable expanding foam used to insulate roof spaces but that will be tougher to get hold of. If you do use the expanding foam be careful as it expands massively.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FIX-FILL-EXPANDING-FOAM-FILLER-500ml-EVERBUILD-QUICK-SETTING-FILLS-GAPS-NEW/181297396687?epid=10011036322&hash=item2a362abbcf:g:ZHkAAMXQVERSzElS:rk:10:pf:0

 

Vinnie

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You can buy a expanding foam from a builders merchant. You would need to purchase a longer piece of tubing to get right into the end. Its not a motor industry solution but worth consideration. Theres also a Canadian breathable expanding foam used to insulate roof spaces but that will be tougher to get hold of. If you do use the expanding foam be careful as it expands massively.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FIX-FILL-EXPANDING-FOAM-FILLER-500ml-EVERBUILD-QUICK-SETTING-FILLS-GAPS-NEW/181297396687?epid=10011036322&hash=item2a362abbcf:g:ZHkAAMXQVERSzElS:rk:10:pf:0
Isn't that Poly URethane foam (PUR)? It isolates, is real sticky and becomes solid in little time?

I only found black adhesive patches of about an inch in diameter. I removed the ones I could get to before I started my vinegar adventure because there was rust underneath. The ones I removed shouldn't be too hard to replace. That said, I think the first of the three baths in this dipping process also dissolves those adhesive patches.

 
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You can buy a expanding foam from a builders merchant. You would need to purchase a longer piece of tubing to get right into the end. Its not a motor industry solution but worth consideration. Theres also a Canadian breathable expanding foam used to insulate roof spaces but that will be tougher to get hold of. If you do use the expanding foam be careful as it expands massively.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FIX-FILL-EXPANDING-FOAM-FILLER-500ml-EVERBUILD-QUICK-SETTING-FILLS-GAPS-NEW/181297396687?epid=10011036322&hash=item2a362abbcf:g:ZHkAAMXQVERSzElS:rk:10:pf:0
Isn't that Poly URethane foam (PUR)? It isolates, is real sticky and becomes solid in little time?

I only found black adhesive patches of about an inch in diameter. I removed the ones I could get to before I started my vinegar adventure because there was rust underneath. The ones I removed shouldn't be too hard to replace. That said, I think the first of the three baths in this dipping process also dissolves those adhesive patches.
Yes Vinnie it comes out the can sticky and expands massively and sets hard. Once hard it can be cut with a knife to remove any excess

 

Vinnie

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Well my Mustang is doing this topic proud by not allowing me to unscrew the rear bumper...

Start:

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Removing the lights was fun coz the rubber is glued to the rusty metal...

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But when removing the bumper, the very last screw became a pita. The nut is kept from spinning by a rectangular plate that it’s stuck into. That plate broke though and the nut popped loose. Also the nut is totally stuck on the screw. I thought I’d try to use my angle grinder to cut it only to find out that my angle grinder which I have only used once about 6 years ago is completely dead. Yay! Another excuse to buy a new tool.

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So I gave up for now and get me a new grinder. Oh and a big 11/16 wrench. That will fit the nut too. In my collection of non metric tools it’s one of the few missing ones...

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Too be continued...

 

detritusmaximus

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The beauty of having SAE and metric is sometimes a socket or wrench from the other set can get a grip on hardware that is slightly rounded or even rusted. Might need a hammer...

Any chance your old grinder has a reset switch it circuit breaker? I have a cutoff tool that quit the first time and it had the reset button hidden under the cord on the back end, really kind of hard to see.

 
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A nut splitter can be very handy, especially when there's not much room to get a grinder to it.

https://www.amazon.com/Steelgrip-2265015-Nut-Splitter-Piece/dp/B003MQIVZA/ref=sr_1_4?crid=3JCQH7L2LY0GL&keywords=nut+splitter+tool&qid=1552858474&s=hi&sprefix=nut+splitt%2Cgarden%2C720&sr=1-4

I wouldn't throw your angle grinder away. I assume it's electric. I would guess it's got a brush stuck and not contacting the commutator. Most electric tools have access for removing the brushes without having to dismantle it.

 
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