'73 Front Disc Brake Question.

Austin Vert

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Luke

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Greg just as an alternative give Hoppers Stoppers in Vic a call it will be Worth your time mate.

 

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Greg the reason I suggest Hoppers Is because the started out developing big brake kits for Mustangs using Aussie gear. This mean that you can get parts anywhere repco, super cheap, autobahn etc. They use DBA and PBR discs and calipers good Aus manufactured components that are branded Brembo on the exotic stuff. You will get everything you need to bolt up the conversion and good support. I know they have a 330mm brake kit for 72s at least. Will run a bit higher than the wilwood kit but easy to get pads etc are the payoff. Just saying check them out before you commit to what ever you decide to buy. You can never have too much brakes.

HOPPERS.COM.AU

Hoppers Stoppers

Phone: (03) 9748 6950

Fax: (03) 97485965

Email: [email protected]


Greg don't forget to ask about rim size requirements.

 
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Austin Vert

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Hi Luke,

Many thanks for your feedback. I did give the web site a look in yesterday,but could not find any connection with my '73 model car. I will give them a ring first up next week and see what they have to offer. Dealing with a company like that makes sense if they have the goods i'm after.

Cheers mate,

Greg.:)

 

tony-muscle

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Hey mate,

I am looking at those Wilwood too. There are other alternatives, but those seem to be well priced.

Another option I am exploring for a similar price is using SSBC caliper + rotor:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ssb-a213 + http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ssb-23017aa2l

However, the SSBC option does not come with the bearings or SS hoses.

Here are more details from the Wilwood site: http://www.wilwood.com/BrakeKits/BrakeKitsProdFront.aspx?itemno=140-13477


BTW, I have been doing a lot of research on brakes and one of the questions I was trying to answer was going with the blank or drilled/slotted rotor options. The drilled option is $100 more. I think I am deciding for blanks. From what I read it seems that with the pad materials of today you don't have to worry about letting the gases formed between pad and rotor go out during braking, which was an issue in the past. Today's material apparently don't create this gas. Also, the drilled disc has less area in contact with the pad which leads to less heat transfer out of the pad, thus a hotter pad. Lastly, drilled discs tend to crack at the holes due to it being a stress riser. However, a lot of people like the drilled rotors because they look cool and high-performance. That's a valid point and up to the buyer. I don't care about the looks and after all it is a classic car.

 
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Austin Vert

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Hey Tony,

Thanks for your feedback. I agree with what you say. If you get around to buying your brake upgrade, would you be kind and post a thread on how you got on?

Greg.:)

 

73 CJ

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Hey mate,

I am looking at those Wilwood too. There are other alternatives, but those seem to be well priced.

Another option I am exploring for a similar price is using SSBC caliper + rotor:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ssb-a213 + http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ssb-23017aa2l

However, the SSBC option does not come with the bearings or SS hoses.

Here are more details from the Wilwood site: http://www.wilwood.com/BrakeKits/BrakeKitsProdFront.aspx?itemno=140-13477


BTW, I have been doing a lot of research on brakes and one of the questions I was trying to answer was going with the blank or drilled/slotted rotor options. The drilled option is $100 more. I think I am deciding for blanks. From what I read it seems that with the pad materials of today you don't have to worry about letting the gases formed between pad and rotor go out during braking, which was an issue in the past. Today's material apparently don't create this gas. Also, the drilled disc has less area in contact with the pad which leads to less heat transfer out of the pad, thus a hotter pad. Lastly, drilled discs tend to crack at the holes due to it being a stress riser. However, a lot of people like the drilled rotors because they look cool and high-performance. That's a valid point and up to the buyer. I don't care about the looks and after all it is a classic car.
There are ALLOT of High End Expensive Exotic Sports Cars ( Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, Maserati, McLaren, etc,etc,) that use Drilled rotors/discs, if "cracking" was a problem, then their wide spread usage would be discontinued...Mark

 

tony-muscle

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Hey mate,

I am looking at those Wilwood too. There are other alternatives, but those seem to be well priced.

Another option I am exploring for a similar price is using SSBC caliper + rotor:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ssb-a213 + http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ssb-23017aa2l

However, the SSBC option does not come with the bearings or SS hoses.

Here are more details from the Wilwood site: http://www.wilwood.com/BrakeKits/BrakeKitsProdFront.aspx?itemno=140-13477


BTW, I have been doing a lot of research on brakes and one of the questions I was trying to answer was going with the blank or drilled/slotted rotor options. The drilled option is $100 more. I think I am deciding for blanks. From what I read it seems that with the pad materials of today you don't have to worry about letting the gases formed between pad and rotor go out during braking, which was an issue in the past. Today's material apparently don't create this gas. Also, the drilled disc has less area in contact with the pad which leads to less heat transfer out of the pad, thus a hotter pad. Lastly, drilled discs tend to crack at the holes due to it being a stress riser. However, a lot of people like the drilled rotors because they look cool and high-performance. That's a valid point and up to the buyer. I don't care about the looks and after all it is a classic car.
There are ALLOT of High End Expensive Exotic Sports Cars ( Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, Maserati, McLaren, etc,etc,) that use Drilled rotors/discs, if "cracking" was a problem, then their wide spread usage would be discontinued...Mark
Okay, let's be more specific. Nothing against Wilwood, but I don't think the Wilwood rotors are of the same quality as those on exotic cars. If you have a normal disc and just drill holes on it, then it is more likely it will crack during hard use or over time.

It is possible though, that if the car is mildly used it will never develop a crack. In any case, it is a matter of preference. I prefer to save $100 and not have the holes.

This is a good read, explains the differences very well highlighting the pros/cons. Note that it mentions the issue about fractures at the holes for street use:

http://www.carbibles.com/brake_bible.html

 
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