Rebuild Update

7173Mustangs.com

Help Support 7173Mustangs.com:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

PeteG41

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2022
Messages
333
Reaction score
168
Location
Tempe, AZ
My Car
351c 2v, FMX Transmission. Ordered from Sanderson Ford in Phoenix, 99k original miles.
Restoration shop was able to tear down my 351 this weekend so figured I would update those that were interested! Tranny is also all cleaned up and rebuilt. I’ve included all the pictures I was sent, as well as the texts I received from the shop. Nothing I didn’t expect to be honest. Could be better news but I guess there’s always worse, at least that’s what I’m sticking with! You can see the pushrod on 8 that I was fighting to get out, as well as the missing one from 5.

Hi Peter,

So, I will send you pictures of your engine during tear down. Clearly, this engine was rebuilt not long ago, or at least doesn’t have many miles on it.

The problem is, the rebuild was very poor, it looks like they just honed the cylinders, also they didn’t properly line up the piston rings. There are cylinders with heavy scrapes or scratches, which take time to get. Also there is something in one of the cylinders, that clearly shows something damaged it.

So, it .030 over now, hopefully we can clean up at .040. The crank is .30 rods and .30 mains. Honestly I don’t like to go more then that, but we will see, we maybe able to just polish the crank, not sure tell it’s verified.

Clearly the valves are not in good shape, possibly just a poor rebuild job, nothing hit them, just think poor rebuild.

The cam, well it’s a stock cam, nothing performance. Why the push rods are bent would indicate over revving, or they are too long, which I doubt. Honestly I feel that, who built it, just didn’t understand what they needed to do, or how to do it.

Didn’t see any issues with the rockers. However when everything thing is cleaned up, I will possibly see more.

Over all it’s a great engine to build.


Also the transmission is done, it was in bad shape, had a lot of rust inside the pump.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_2195.jpeg
    IMG_2195.jpeg
    574.3 KB · Views: 3
  • IMG_2200.jpeg
    IMG_2200.jpeg
    2.1 MB · Views: 2
  • IMG_2203.jpeg
    IMG_2203.jpeg
    3.5 MB · Views: 1
  • IMG_2206.jpeg
    IMG_2206.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 2
  • IMG_2207.jpeg
    IMG_2207.jpeg
    2.1 MB · Views: 3
  • IMG_2208.jpeg
    IMG_2208.jpeg
    2.3 MB · Views: 0
  • IMG_2209.jpeg
    IMG_2209.jpeg
    2.1 MB · Views: 1
  • IMG_2211.jpeg
    IMG_2211.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 1
  • IMG_2212.jpeg
    IMG_2212.jpeg
    2.5 MB · Views: 1
  • IMG_2198.jpeg
    IMG_2198.jpeg
    2 MB · Views: 3
  • IMG_2213.jpeg
    IMG_2213.jpeg
    4.7 MB · Views: 4
Last edited:
It's great your builder is keeping you updated on things. Progress!
We love progress! I waited about 4 months for a space in this shop to open up, and I think it is well worth the wait. Especially after talking to a couple other local places, definite peace of mind at this one. Working 60+ hours a week for the past year to be able to fund this, so seeing it coming together is exciting.
 
So glad things are moving along for you. Looks like you'll have 'er on the road pretty soon!
 
Did he clarify "they didn't properly line up the piston rings"? Aren't those things supposed to spin around on a properly functioning engine? Lining them up during assembly is just to help the builder's OCD.
 
How's the re-build going? Looking forward to hearing that you're on the road!
Still in the machine shop. Salty doesn't begin to describe it but its not like I can make them go faster. I know it being worked on because parts have been ordered, but no updates yet.
 
Sigh, me too. Been waiting for 20 months now. Just got a call on Monday asking what colour to paint the block. All the parts are in so hopefully it’s all assembled next week and the dyno is done.
 
Sigh, me too. Been waiting for 20 months now. Just got a call on Monday asking what colour to paint the block. All the parts are in so hopefully it’s all assembled next week and the dyno is done.
20 months makes me feel a little better. I'm getting a little impatient over here but that puts it into perspective. The saving grace is that I have seen the work the shop does so I know it will be correct, just didn't anticipate waiting this long.
 
20 months makes me feel a little better. I'm getting a little impatient over here but that puts it into perspective. The saving grace is that I have seen the work the shop does so I know it will be correct, just didn't anticipate waiting this long.
My engine builder has taken upwards of 2+ years and only has the short block finished so far. Yep. the builder is me.
 

Attachments

  • ShortBlock.jpg
    ShortBlock.jpg
    3.3 MB · Views: 0
My engine builder has taken upwards of 2+ years and only has the short block finished so far. Yep. the builder is me.
That's fantastic. I know its a slow process. I wish I had the skills to tackle the engine build. Bought the 73 in may of '22. Picked up a weekend job to supplement the build since my weekends to work on it were now free because of the unscheduled rapid disassembly. Was able to stash away 15k or so. But on a progress note the tranny is done and some of the machining.
 
I actually should have had it done in 6 months or less. Too many other projects/distractions. As far as
getting outside work done I always pay for quality of parts and machining. Which entitles you to expect quality work and
to loudly complain if you don't ! Part of the time problem is so very few competent shops are left. So they are usually inundated
with work because of their reputations.

Machining takes time, especially if it is done in a fastidious manner. We had a fellow who had a shop in Cincinnati called Competition Milling Service. He did excellent machine work and built some fast engines. Warren Gross (R.I.P) was one of the nicest human beings I ever meant. But he was a slow as molasses at the polar ice cap. LOL Part of Warren's problem was he couldn't get himself to to charge the appropriate rate for his work. So on top of racers looking for a quality job, he had every Joe cheapskate for customers as well.

Another issue engine shops don't share is they don't actually so some of the work in house. They send it out and charge for it plus adding on their mark-up. Standard procedure, nothing nefarious about it. Great example is crank grinding, which requires proper equipment, skill, while tolerating the tedium that comes with it. So most shops send them to a crank grinding service who even fewer in number! And the really good ones are backed up with jobs. So some of the wait is because the engine shop is waiting on the outside vendors who are navigating a plethora of customers themselves.

To make matters worse there is a problem of parts being backed up in the supply chain since Covid. I have a friend who had to wait 9 months for a set of rings for the Ford 460 he was building. Not making excuses for engine shops but just trying to point out the reality of getting a quality engine build these days.
 
Last edited:
Irishman, Warren did the machine work on my first hot rod engine (390 FE) in 1971. He did great work. His Modified Production vet was really fast.Thanks for reminding me of Warren. Chuck
 
I actually should have had it done in 6 months or less. Too many other projects/distractions. As far as
getting outside work done I always pay for quality of parts and machining. Which entitles you to expect quality work and
to loudly complain if you don't ! Part of the time problem is so very few competent shops are left. So they are usually inundated
with work because of their reputations.

Machining takes time, especially if it is done in a fastidious manner. We had a fellow who had a shop in Cincinnati called Competition Milling Service. He did excellent machine work and built some fast engines. Warren Gross (R.I.P) was one of the nicest human beings I ever meant. But he was a slow as molasses at the polar ice cap. LOL Part of Warren's problem was he couldn't get himself to to charge the appropriate rate for his work. So on top of racers looking for a quality job, he had every Joe cheapskate for customers as well.

Another issue engine shops don't share is they don't actually so some of the work in house. They send it out and charge for it plus adding on their mark-up. Standard procedure, nothing nefarious about it. Great example is crank grinding, which requires proper equipment, skill, while tolerating the tedium that comes with it. So most shops send them to a crank grinding service who even fewer in number! And the really good ones are backed up with jobs. So some of the wait is because the engine shop is waiting on the outside vendors who are navigating a plethora of customers themselves.

To make matters worse there is a problem of parts being backed up in the supply chain since Covid. I have a friend who had to wait 90 months for a set of rings for the Ford 460 he was building. Not making excuses for engine shops but just trying to point out the reality of getting a quality engine build these days.
Yep thats the case with this shop. They go to the same machine shop for all of the work they need done. The shop pulled/disassembled, and sent everything off to him for the machine work. From what I understand that machine shop isn't taking public work, just from a couple shops he has built a relationship with. Then once the machining is done, they will get it back and assemble it in house, along with the rest of the work that will need to be done. AKA, rebuilding the a/c, heater core, FI setup, and pretty much all the suspension. Still has all the factory parts so 50 years later its quite worn out. I am sure other small things will pop up that need to be addressed as well.
 
Did he clarify "they didn't properly line up the piston rings"? Aren't those things supposed to spin around on a properly functioning engine? Lining them up during assembly is just to help the builder's OCD.
I wonder if the machine shop guy meant offsetting the ring gaps so they don’t line up.
 
I wonder if the machine shop guy meant offsetting the ring gaps so they don’t line up.
That still doesn't matter after the engine's been run. The rings rotate around the piston and the gaps move around in relation to each other.
 
Holy Cow! Times have lengthened substantially since I had mine done in February of 2021!
The Shop I took it to, Arizona Engine Rebuilding, was pretty busy, and they took about 6 weeks, to do this:
  • PISTON'S & RINGS
  • ROD & MAIN BEARINGS
  • CAM BEARINGS (WHERE APPLICABLE)
  • OIL PUMP
  • TIMING CHAIN & GEARS OR TIMING BELT
  • ALL NEW GASKET/SEALS
  • CYLINDER HEAD BOLTS
  • FREEZE PLUGS
  • 3 ANGLE VALVE JOB
  • INSTALATION KIT - OIL, FILTER, COOLANT, GASKET SET
  • R & R ENGINE
  • NOTCH BLOCK OUT FOR ROLLER CAM
  • WELD CRACKED HEAD & INSTALL SEAT
  • RETRO ROLLER CAM & LIFTER UPGRADE
  • ROLLER ROCKERS
  • oil switch
  • water pump
  • spark plugs
  • thermostat housing
  • coolant temp sensor
  • electric ignition
  • carb gasket
  • carb mount gasket
  • distributor plate
And they did a great job too. I hope you are as satisfied with the work you're having done.
 
Holy Cow! Times have lengthened substantially since I had mine done in February of 2021!
The Shop I took it to, Arizona Engine Rebuilding, was pretty busy, and they took about 6 weeks, to do this:
  • PISTON'S & RINGS
  • ROD & MAIN BEARINGS
  • CAM BEARINGS (WHERE APPLICABLE)
  • OIL PUMP
  • TIMING CHAIN & GEARS OR TIMING BELT
  • ALL NEW GASKET/SEALS
  • CYLINDER HEAD BOLTS
  • FREEZE PLUGS
  • 3 ANGLE VALVE JOB
  • INSTALATION KIT - OIL, FILTER, COOLANT, GASKET SET
  • R & R ENGINE
  • NOTCH BLOCK OUT FOR ROLLER CAM
  • WELD CRACKED HEAD & INSTALL SEAT
  • RETRO ROLLER CAM & LIFTER UPGRADE
  • ROLLER ROCKERS
  • oil switch
  • water pump
  • spark plugs
  • thermostat housing
  • coolant temp sensor
  • electric ignition
  • carb gasket
  • carb mount gasket
  • distributor plate
And they did a great job too. I hope you are as satisfied with the work you're having done.
I should be satisfied, I have been all through their shop and checked out the work that they have done/are in the process of. Doesn't change my attitude that its taking this long but I think its a safe assumption that the machine shop has some sort of a backlog.
 
As if on cue just got an update. The heads are done, the crank is done, now moving on to the piston combination.
 
We love progress! I waited about 4 months for a space in this shop to open up, and I think it is well worth the wait. Especially after talking to a couple other local places, definite peace of mind at this one. Working 60+ hours a week for the past year to be able to fund this, so seeing it coming together is exciting.
I was lucky I guess. I only waited a month to get mine in the shop. Front suspension, rear spring bushings, water pump, carb rebuild, and a power steering leak. I can't wait to get the bill.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top